PRIORITIZE HOW PEOPLE MOVE, NOT HOW WE MOVE PEOPLE

WHERE YOU CAN GO IS WHAT YOU CAN DO

Transportation is about access to opportunities. If you can’t get there, you can’t participate. 

Everyone should have access to the transportation options that can unlock their full potential. 

We need reliable and predictable transportation choices that respond to the needs of communities. 

We need to design streets for people and to plan for complete communities. 

 

STOP SPRAWL,
NOT DEVELOPMENT

ZONING MATTERS

The majority of residential land in Toronto is zoned for single-detached homes. This is a barrier to meeting Toronto’s growing housing demands.

Blocking new development results in sprawling cities that miss out on the benefits that density can bring. 

We need to allow for more flexible zoning that adapts to community needs and makes effective use of existing infrastructure. 

 

PREVENT JOB LOSS,
NOT AUTOMATION

THE FUTURE OF (YOUR) WORK

In the next ten years, over 25% of Canadian jobs will be “heavily disrupted by technology.” Rather than oppose the changing nature of work, we need to embrace it and design for disruption. 

Emerging technologies can unlock human potential and lead to more meaningful employment opportunities.

We need to experiment with economic models that promote an inclusive and equitable future. 

 

VALUE FOOD FOR NUTRITION,
NOT STATUS

IF IT’S NOT ACCESSIBLE, IT’S NOT AFFORDABLE

The ways we treat, market and value food makes access to food unfair and unequal. Healthy food is often unnecessarily expensive. 

If healthy food cannot be accessed by everyone, it’s not an affordable solution. 

We need to develop a food system that values nutrition more than status to ensure equitable access to healthy food.

 

FIGHT DISPLACEMENT,
NOT INTENSIFICATION

CITIES CHANGE, AND THEY NEED TO

We need to protect community members and residents from displacement so the benefits of intensification are more inclusive.

Intensification brings services, opportunities and much-needed diversity to communities. It becomes a problem when the changes don’t meet new demands for housing and fail to protect the rights of the original residents.